What does it mean to read?

If you ask an interactive designer that question then you're going to get a different answer to that question than if you ask a writer. If you ask a r

(I'm on a roll today)

If you ask an interactive designer that question then you're going to get a different answer to that question than if you ask a writer. If you ask a reader, then a changed response again. Some of them will foreground reading as a personal experience, some as a moment to be communicated to others, to be shared in some way. If you ask a child you'll get a different response. An adult alternate again.

We're interested in the common ground between all of those potential answers, and we're especially interested in exploring what happens when we change the terms of those answers by altering the substrate of the written word. I'm especially fond of mangling an already misquoted Karl Marx remark (a book isn't a book until it's read) to imply that the act of interaction gives rise to meaning in digital space.

What that might mean (for our audience) is that their relationship with the story being told (and being participated in) is designed to be both personal and social. There is a route through the narrative itself that makes sense on reading, so on a conventional level, the text can be read and experienced in a linear fashion, but there's also an experienced, social narrative that isn't simply a summation of the story through different eyes, but does operate as a conflation of content and platforms, filtered through multiple readers.

And here's a map. With pins in. Gillian Lees just remarked that this was how Prototype built Fortnight, so I'm reassured that we're doing something right...


 

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